How it works

Vibra 3.0 and Vibra GO generate selective square wave mechanical-sound vibrations simultaneously on multiple outputs for the non-invasive treatment of muscular and neuromuscular pathologies. The first scientific works on the use of vibrations in medicine dates to 1949, but it is only thanks to current technological progress that it has been possible to exploit the therapeutic value of vibrations to the full. Since then, scientific and biomedical research has led to new applications and to ground-breaking confirmations, opening up new scenarios for the use of vibration for therapeutic purposes.

How it
works

The vibrations generated by Vibra 3.0 and Vibra GO are transmitted locally to cutaneous receptors through dedicated transducers placed on the muscles areas in a NON-INVASIVE manner. The selective square wave mechanical-sound vibrations interact principally with the mechanoreceptors, Golgi tendon organs and neuromuscular spindles. As each of these has a different sensitivity to vibration frequency, Vibra 3.0 and Vibra GO allow selective activation through optimal control of frequency and pressure intensity.
Afferents activated by the vibrations carry the exteroceptive and proprioceptive information to the spinal cord neural circuits, (where the first therapeutic interactions occur), to the sensory-motor cortex and to the cerebellum. As a result of the alterations induced by the use of specific frequencies, Vibra 3.0 and Vibra GO are able to accelerate functional recovery, improving proprioception, muscle tone, endurance and muscular coordination.

The beneficial effects are obtained rapidly and last over time. In combination with appropriate amount of physical activity, you can increase the effect obtained and further accelerate functional recovery.


Muscle and receptors - transducers

Muscle and receptors - transducers

By selecting the appropriate frequencies, the vibration stimulus can act on specific mechanoreceptors, including: Meissner and Merkel receptors located in the surface layers of the skin; Ruffini and Pacini corpuscles in the deeper layers; the Golgi tendon organs; and the Ia fibres of the neuromuscular spindles.
Afferent fibres

Afferent fibres

Once the mechanoreceptors are selectively activated, the vibration stimulus travels along type I myelinated large-calibre rapid-conduction fibres. The vibration stimulus is more selective than TENS in activating large-calibre fibres involved in pain modulation at the level of the spine.
Spinal cord

Spinal cord

When it reaches the spinal cord, the stimulus, depending on the stimulation parameters selected by the operator, can induce a number of different responses: activation of the spinal gate, evocation of the TVR (Tonic Vibration Reflex) or reciprocal inhibition.
Suprasegmental centres and cortical sensory-motor integration

Suprasegmental centres and cortical sensory-motor integration

Vibration can improve the integration between afferent nerve impulses and the motor response at the suprasegmental level thanks to the capacity to vary the frequency and pressure intensity of the stimulus with great precision.
Transmitting a new message to the muscle via an efferent fibre

Transmitting a new message to the muscle via an efferent fibre

As a result of alterations induced at a suprasegmental level, vibration is able to improve the motor output during voluntary activation through improved functional organization, altering the order of recruitment of muscle fibres.
Muscle

Muscle

The alteration of the fibre recruitment pattern has clinical consequences and allows different athletic performances to be obtained.